=

THE HALFCUT RAINFOREST CAUSE

-protection & reforestation-

Halfcut is a fundraising movement started by James Stanton-Cooke (aka Jimmy Halfcut) and Jessica Clarke with the sole purpose of buying up and protecting endangered rainforest globally. Every year, the 31st August signifies the #halfcut Challenge Day where fundraising champions cut half of their beard or braid half of their hair as a symbol of support for the movement.

YOUR PURCHASE SAVES RAINFORESTS - In addition to 'Us and The Earth' purchasing 1m2 with every $200 spent, you also have the option to donate a bit more at checkout.

WHERE DOES THE MONEY GO? - Our collaboration with HalfCut means that we are able to stop deforestation, protect rainforests, and save both endangered species and indigenous communities. Weather systems, water sources and reduced habitats all need to be protected by ensuring that the forests are secure and remain intact.

Your purchase saves rainforests

In addition to 'Us and The Earth' purchasing 1m2 with every $200 spent, you also have the option to donate a bit more at checkout.

WHERE DOES THE MONEY GO?

We STOP deforestation, we PROTECT rainforests, SAVE endangered Species and Communities. Weather systems, water sources and reduced habitats all need to be protected by ensuring that the forests are secure and remain intact.

100% of the raised money is donated directly to the 'Worldwide Rainforest Conservation Fund', a new fund aiming to raise US$15 Million by December 2020. The monies are dispersed to over 151 urgent projects spanning the globe and on average US$2 ( AUD$2.50) will buy an acre of rainforest.

More than 50% of the world's rainforests are gone!

When you donate every cent of your gift will support our most urgent conservation work. With the partnership with Rainforest 4 we are able to direct 100% of your donation directly to conservation action.

Land purchases are highly strategic, often land parcels are protected by purchasing just the perimeter of land around an at-risk rainforest. This land is then gifted to local indigenous and/or environmental groups. As the land is now privately owned by these groups, they can deny logging companies access to their land and in turn, this means the parcel in the centre is land-locked and no machinery can gain access to it.

These rainforests are often in developing countries, meaning our stronger currency goes further.

Rainforest trust also works with these local groups offering consultation on sustained protection and development of new industries, typically eco-tourism.